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Jessie Darling!




My sweet fat boy!

My sweet fat boy!


bobbycaputo:

Fun Fact Friday: Ever wonder where all the New Year’s Eve confetti in Times Square comes from? Each year, people from around the world write their wishes, hopes, and dreams for the upcoming year on tiny colored papers, which are then displayed on the Wishing Wall in the TS Visitor Center. These wishes are then collected and added to the one ton of confetti that is released at midnight in celebration of the New Year!Can’t be in NYC? Write your wish here: http://bit.ly/UvGpn8

bobbycaputo:

Fun Fact Friday: Ever wonder where all the New Year’s Eve confetti in Times Square comes from? Each year, people from around the world write their wishes, hopes, and dreams for the upcoming year on tiny colored papers, which are then displayed on the Wishing Wall in the TS Visitor Center. These wishes are then collected and added to the one ton of confetti that is released at midnight in celebration of the New Year!

Can’t be in NYC? Write your wish here: http://bit.ly/UvGpn8


35 notes ∞ Reblog 1 year ago
Me and my girl :) samantha.

Me and my girl :) samantha.


Made me laugh so hard!!!!!!!

Made me laugh so hard!!!!!!!


1,169 notes ∞ Reblog 1 year ago
bobbycaputo:

Arc De triomphe by Dark Saga/ Lefteris Efraimis on Flickr.

bobbycaputo:

Arc De triomphe by Dark Saga/ Lefteris Efraimis on Flickr.


45 notes ∞ Reblog 1 year ago
bobbycaputo:

Iconic Photo: Watching Bwana Devil in 3D at the Paramount Theater
This iconic photograph by LIFE magazine photojournalist J. R. Eyerman turned 60 this past week. Shot at the Paramount Theater in Hollywood in 1952, the image shows the opening-night screening of the first ever full-length, color 3D movie, titled Bwana Devil.Two interesting facts regarding the image: (1) Polaroid played a role in what the moviegoers were watching and what they were wearing, and (2) the people in the photo didn’t actually enjoy the film.
Here’s what LIFE magazine said about the Paramount audience at the time:

These megalopic creatures are the first paying audience for the latest cinematic novelty, Natural Vision. This process gets a three-dimensional effect by using two projectors with Polaroid filters and giving the spectators Polaroid spectacles to wear. The movie at the premiere, called Bwana Devil, did achieve some striking three-dimensional sequences. But members of the audience reported that the glasses were uncomfortable, the film itself — dealing with two scholarly looking lions who ate up quantities of humans in Africa — was dull, and it was generally agreed that the audience itself looked more startling than anything on the screen.

The December 15, 1952 LIFE magazine issue in which this quote appeared dedicated a full page to the photograph above. It would soon go on to become an iconic image in American culture and the defining image of Eyerman’s career.

bobbycaputo:

Iconic Photo: Watching Bwana Devil in 3D at the Paramount Theater

This iconic photograph by LIFE magazine photojournalist J. R. Eyerman turned 60 this past week. Shot at the Paramount Theater in Hollywood in 1952, the image shows the opening-night screening of the first ever full-length, color 3D movie, titled Bwana Devil.

Two interesting facts regarding the image: (1) Polaroid played a role in what the moviegoers were watching and what they were wearing, and (2) the people in the photo didn’t actually enjoy the film.

Here’s what LIFE magazine said about the Paramount audience at the time:

These megalopic creatures are the first paying audience for the latest cinematic novelty, Natural Vision. This process gets a three-dimensional effect by using two projectors with Polaroid filters and giving the spectators Polaroid spectacles to wear. The movie at the premiere, called Bwana Devil, did achieve some striking three-dimensional sequences. But members of the audience reported that the glasses were uncomfortable, the film itself — dealing with two scholarly looking lions who ate up quantities of humans in Africa — was dull, and it was generally agreed that the audience itself looked more startling than anything on the screen.

The December 15, 1952 LIFE magazine issue in which this quote appeared dedicated a full page to the photograph above. It would soon go on to become an iconic image in American culture and the defining image of Eyerman’s career.


13,075 notes ∞ Reblog 1 year ago

myedol:

Kummakivi by Mother Nature

Kummakivi is the Finnish word for “Strange Rock”. This geological formation is found at Valtola in Southern Savonia, Finland and is a quite a sight to behold. Surrounded by dense forest, this gigantic monolith balances precariously upon another rock, the latter being curved with a smooth surface. How the rock formation occurred is still a mystery. Its tale is known by many in the local area but only seen by a select few, as it’s rather tricky to track down.

[via: GBlog]


8,733 notes ∞ Reblog 1 year ago

sosuperawesome:

MariLucia


386 notes ∞ Reblog 1 year ago
alwaysmarilynmonroe:

Marilyn by Bert Stern in June 1962.

alwaysmarilynmonroe:

Marilyn by Bert Stern in June 1962.


1,456 notes ∞ Reblog 1 year ago

60,159 notes ∞ Reblog 1 year ago
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